Bitter taste TAS2R14 activation by intracellular tastants and cholesterol. (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/38776963/)

These scientists wanted to understand how our taste buds can detect bitter flavors. They studied a specific taste receptor called TAS2R14, which helps us taste bitter things like certain foods and medicines.

To do this, the scientists used a special microscope called cryo-electron microscopy to take pictures of TAS2R14 when it was attached to different bitter substances like aristolochic acid, flufenamic acid, and compound 28.1. They also looked at how TAS2R14 interacts with different types of proteins in our bodies.

What they found was really interesting! They saw that these bitter substances bind to TAS2R14 in a unique way, activating the receptor to send signals to our brains that something tastes bitter. They also discovered that TAS2R14 can interact with different proteins in our bodies to help us taste bitter things.

By learning more about how TAS2R14 works, these scientists hope to improve our understanding of taste perception and maybe even find new ways to develop medicines or foods that taste better.

Hu X., Ao W., Gao M., Wu L., Pei Y., Liu S., Wu Y., Zhao F., Sun Q., Liu J., Jiang L., Wang X., Li Y., Tan Q., Cheng J., Yang F., Yang C., Sun J., Hua T., Liu ZJ. Bitter taste TAS2R14 activation by intracellular tastants and cholesterol. Nature. 2024 May 22. doi: 10.1038/s41586-024-07569-9.

ichini | 3 weeks ago | 0 comments | Reply